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1. Böker Plus Urban Survival
SIZE: 5.7 inches total; 1.6-inch blade length; 0.1-inch blade thickness; 1-ounce weight

MATERIAL: 440C blade, aluminum handle

MSRP: $52

Designed by Jim Wagner, the Urban Survival is an extremely compact knife that fits in a briefcase penholder. At just 1 ounce, it weighs almost nothing (literally). You don’t even notice you’re carrying it … until you need it. The blade is made of American 440C stainless steel and has a scalpellike tip that is perfect for detailed cutting jobs. It uses screw-type blade lifters, and a linerlock keeps the blade securely open.

It comes with a glass-breaker tip installed, but it is removable so other compatible tips can be installed— such as a Kubotan. It has a pocket clip that can be swapped from the right to the left side but is for tipup carry only. A law enforcement model also includes a fold-out handcuff key and arresting pin.

 

2. Browning Harper Concealed Carry Handbag
OPTIONS: Brown or gray

MSRP: $100

This handbag is designed for the modern concealed-carry woman. It opens via magnetic closure to a main compartment with a separator. The separator opens from the top using a lockable zipper for access to the concealed-carry compartment and a removable nylon holster attached via a hook-and-loop closure. Access can also be had on both sides of the bag, also using a lockable zipper. It has an internal organizer for pens, ID, cards and other items.

The two handbag straps are easily removed for conversion to backpack or crossbody carry using two adjustable backpack straps. The handbag has a wide base to sit upright and includes heavy-duty, antique-style hardware and the Browning-branded trim. It is made of synthetic “leather” with a 100 percent polyester camouflage lining.

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3. Federal Premium Edge TLR
CALIBER/LOAD: .308 Win 175-grain; .30-06 Spring 175-grain; .300 Win Mag 200-grain; .300 Win Short Mag 200-grain

MSRP: $50 (.308 and .30-06); $60 (.300 Win Mag and .300 Win Short Mag)

Take long-range match-grade accuracy, give it a bonded hunting bullet, and you get the Edge TLR (“terminal long range”). The high-heat-resistant Slipstream tip initiates expansion at long ranges— even once the bullet slows to lower velocities. The copper shank and bonded lead core allow it to hold together for deep penetration. It’s also effective at close ranges. Initially offered in four time-proven loads, it’s a true, all-distance, wide range-of-velocities hunting load.

 

4. Weapon Shield Maintenance Kit
INCLUDES: 4-ounce bottle of solvent, 4-ounce bottle of CLP, precision needle oiler of CLP, syringe of grease

MSRP: $35

Everything in this kit is nonflammable, non-toxic, user-safe and environmentally friendly—all of which doesn’t mean squat if a product doesn’t work. However, we’ve been very impressed with these Weapon Shield products. The grease was used in a belt-fed M249S through two belts of ammo; so far, no issues. The solvent made quick work of a moderately fouled AR. We just sprayed it on and let it sit for about 10 minutes. Most fouling wiped off with a rag; the rest required a nylon brush. Trouble spots such as the BCG needed a scraper, but it came off easily. The CLP has been used in an AR—again, no stoppages.

We haven’t used it, alone, for cleaning, but it has helped make for an easy cleanup for the solvent. We have not tested the protective element of it at this time.

 

5. TRUGLO TRU-TEC 20mm
SPECS: 2 MOA reticle; 20mm objective; auto off/on

MSRP: $221

TruGlo optics used to be a bit of a joke—okay for casual use, but not for serious shooters. Things are different now.

We’ve been running this one on our AR without a glitch for more than eight months now— and still on the same battery. This optic has withstood recoil up to .458 SOCOM. But what does-in an optic is what happens between shots: Ours has been knocked about, submerged underwater and unintentionally dropped onto a concrete floor while it was mounted on a rifle. It’s still running strong. This optic comes with low and high mounts.

 

Editor’s note: A version of this article first appeared in the October 2017 print issue of Gun World Magazine.